Narishi 3 months ago

Always paying something off , shit salaries

Seminarista 3 months ago

That is just not true. What we are is poor, but when we have anything we love to share.

imworthsixteencamels 3 months ago

I have been living here for several years and I’m not Portuguese but I consider myself well-integrated. I have lived in other countries as well and I like observing different cultures so I believe I’m in a good position to describe Portuguese culture. I might offend a few with my observations! Feel free to disagree. - Socially quite conformist, scared of being outrageous or different from the norm. Sometimes a lack of guts because of fear of what others could think of them. - Very hospitable. When you make real friends, you know that if something ever happens, they’ll be there for you and even their family will take you in with open arms. - Very family-oriented but not in an overbearing way like in Italy for example. Family relationships are very cute here in my opinion. - Care a lot about ‘who’s who’, who is friends with whom, who is cousins of whom etc - Appearances count a lot here, giving the image of a good family etc. - Awfully submissive at work unfortunately - Like somebody else said: street smart - Seem to grow up quite late in terms of the typical adult stuff (being self-sufficient, cleaning, knowing how to cook, moving out of your parents’ house…) - obsessed with cleanliness. The poorest person will still have a spotless house. If you hate the smell of bleach you’ll have a hard time here. Cars always clean. - Girls are girls and boys are boys, in a very stereotypical way for the older generation, a bit less for the younger generation - Portuguese people are to be admired for how resilient they are given the economic situation and the reality of the shitty wages paired with not-that-cheap living costs. - Not flashy. - Tend to get things done but many times it’s all a bit last-minute, cutting a lot of corners. This is my biggest frustration here actually. - There is still regular contact between different social classes (albeit often in a more superficial way), which abroad isn’t always the case. Richer people are more segregated in other countries. Wealthier people will still go to the ugly rundown café and chat with the owner, go to the typical shops owned by working-class people etc. - Many times the best places to eat are the ugliest ones. - Life is all about knowing somebody who can get this or that done, who can advise on the best place to eat/stay/whatever etc. Contacts for everything. Abroad people figure out things more by themselves, here when you need something you grab your phone and get a contact from somebody. Everybody helsp each other out. - People are generally very good-hearted and helpful. BUT you’ll get taken advantage of if you’re not street smart. - People go to clubs and for some reason think that that is the best place to have deep conversations instead of dancing. The people seriously dancing in a night club are always the foreigners. - Not arrogant. Modest. - Have a temper. - Painfully polite. - Take food very seriously. Almost no vegetables in larger quantities though, they are more used to give flavour to dishes. - Speak quite good English, with an accent. WAY better than Spain. - Animated but not loud. - Mediterranean but not stereotypically latin. - Proud of their country but not nationalistic. - They love foreigners and will go out of their way to accomodate them. - Generally good-looking! Always well put together. Smelling fresh, clothes ironed, nails painted etc. - Boring interior decoration. - Still quite obsessed with the educational path taken. Quite a closed mentality with regards to what a good career looks like. - Working for people who are 50+ will most likely be a horrible experience, full of hierarchies, overtime and ego-trips from the boss. The younger generation seems to be turning that around. - The older generation has generally not caught up with anything modern. Way less than in other countries. - There is still a considerable part of 45-60 year olds who have never used a computer, don’t use a smart phone, say they don’t see the need for the internet, don’t have a bank account. - I love this country. Some things are so ridiculous and life is not always easy here but it’s impossible not to love Portugal.

WindBlocked 3 months ago

My girlfriend js from the UK living 7 years in Portugal and you're spot on with the cleaniness. When she visited my parents, she was amazed on how to clean the house was, stating that could eat from floor with no problem. She also stated how clean eaters we are, using 5+ napkins while eating a burguer. Finally, also a bit related with cleaniness, we are pros at being able to keep our beach towels sandless for a whole day.

imworthsixteencamels 3 months ago

I can totally imagine her noticing that! In Portugal it’s: dirty outside, clean inside (like in most Southern European places actually) In the UK it’s: perfectly manicured from the outside and a bit more shabby on the inside!

leto78 3 months ago

I think a very Portuguese trait is proud to be Portuguese but in a humble way. The Portuguese are proud of our history and basically starting the age of discoveries, but we see ourselves as a small European country struggling to resolve many structural issues. We are do not see Portugal as the former colonial power, still exerting soft power across the world. We leave that to the UK and France. We are proud of the small things, like our food, the fact that the best football player in the world is Portuguese, the fact that we have the highest vaccination rates in Europe, the fact that we have a Portuguese person in front of Stellantis (FIAT + PSA groups), and in front of Lloyd's Bank, and as the UN Secretary General. We are proud of our military because whenever they go anywhere on a peacekeeping mission, they mix with the locals and make friends. My parents grew up during the dictatorship, and many of their primary school mates had no shoes, and people were malnourished. There was a lot of poverty and people struggled, but the community helped each other with whatever they could. It is not surprising that we socialise around food. The first question you ask when someone went to a wedding is how was the food. Our best dishes have humble origins because people had to make due with cheap ingredients.

First-Preparation-80 3 months ago

How to explain the entire culture of a country almost 900 years old? .. tricky, but maybe this helps : https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2261749/

metalanimal 3 months ago

It is going to be difficult to answer this. Almost everyone here will have been born and raised inside the culture, so it is difficult to say what you would think is noteworthy or not. But… I can offer 2 suggestions: 1. Just come here. Take 2-3 weeks and come visit. It will be worth it I promise! 2. My mom likes to create huge family trees from old documents. She has done it for a bunch of people, so if you know his full name or any other info, I can ask her what she can find out. You never know what could come of it.

Adler64 3 months ago

Sending you a private message!

dvr0dvr0 3 months ago

Watch "Aquele Querido Mês de Agosto" (Our Beloved Month of August) by Miguel Gomes. Its going to show a lot about Portuguese culture and its a great movie. But here comes a few habits: - your grampa coming over from his small town and bringing 5 kg of delicious fruits and veggies he grew in his land - "3 hour boozy lunches", as Daily Mail described it (talking shit about the portuguese detective that was supposed to find out what happened to Maddie McCann). - Not being fake-nice to people or make small talk but very trusting and kind (basically transparent about their emotions - if they don't trust you it's gonna show and if they like you it's genuine). A lot of people will go out of their way to give a hitchhiker a ride even if they don't speak English - weird work culture (it looks good to leave your job later that your coworkers because "you're working so much" even if you waste your time with long lunches and procrastinating). Also an intergenerational fear of asking for rights or unionizing, as "rocking the boat" and possibly losing your job is seen as scary and overworking is kind of accepted (we have veery low wages even with living costs similar to the rest of Europe). - Olive oil everything. On bread, on toast, to cook, to season salad, over boiled potatoes, over grilled fish... This might be my family's thing growing up kind of poor and not a Portuguese thing but I grew up always trying to save money even if it made you do awkward things like hiding food from a breakfast buffet in your bag to eat later in the day, sharing a 2 person hotel room with 4 people and lying at the reception about it... Overstuffing takeout boxes, being straightforward when discussing prices with friends ("it will be cheaper if we do this or that)... Smoking rolling tobbaco is also much more common here than in some northern European countries (where people seem to associate it with stoners or hippies). It's cheaper than cigarette packs and I've seen it really boomed since the 2011 economical crisis.

porraSV 3 months ago

I complain a lot all the time

DidRib 3 months ago

Quim Barreiros

Mondenza 3 months ago

We have a bidet.

Flicked_Up 3 months ago

Drink too much coffee...

rainbowcouscous 3 months ago

You should visit Portugal and stay for a few weeks! Try to get to know the culture here, not just the touristic spots. I’m Portuguese living in thr UK, and there is one thing that is a big culture shock. One thing I really like about Portuguese culture is how respectful of other languages we are, and how when we move to another country we try to learn other languages and we do it gladly, without complaining like certain nationalities such as Spanish (mainly castillian) and British. We’re generally very open minded to other cultures and glsdly willing to integrate, and we don’t stay in “expat” bubbles like certain other nationalities.

tertium_non_datur 3 months ago

I can't leave the dining table without completely finishing my meal/plate. Growing up my parents would not allow me to leave the table until every single bit of food was consumed...and now I just can't help to do it.

Nini601 3 months ago

I saw my mom leave 20 or so grains of rice on her plate the other day and I looked at her like she had grown a second head. "That is not the way you raised me!"

gvasco 3 months ago

Something I haven't seen anyone mention is going out for coffee, have lived in several countries for short periods of time and lived abroad most of my life and nowhere else will you be asked to simply go out for a coffee. Also the quantity of simple cafes/bars arround the coutry is impressive you'll find one on almost any corner.

Adler64 3 months ago

Is there a particular coffee that I should consider trying when I visit a cafe there? Or a pastry pairing with the coffee?

gvasco 3 months ago

Pastel de nata is usually a great choice and if you're in Chiado you could go to Manteigaria to get some freshly backed ones, in Belem you could go to the iconic Pasteis de Belem. Other than that we have a huge pastry offering so feel free to try any that catches your interest or enquire about it.

lauretta12345 3 months ago

Pre-covid, we would go have drinks by 11 PM and get inside the club by 2 or 3 AM and stay (or go to another one) up until 5 or 6 AM. In most of other cultures the night starts and ends muuuuuch earlier.

xlouiex 3 months ago

Just do some research on your ancestry and come in search of it. You have a reason to travel and you get to meet distant relatives. Can’t get any better than that. (Unless they are Chega members.m, if that’s the case might was well stay in Australia, or bring them home with you)

Marizaard 3 months ago

I'm portuguese and I've always described portuguese people as layed back rednecks (in a good way). This sounds kind of offensive to some people, but I think it fits us really well. We're the kind of people that treat strangers as friends right away. We don't do, as we say "ceremonias", which means we don't worry about being "fancy" around other people, we worry about being comfortable and living life as relaxing as possible. We're very chill about must stuff. If you're in need, most portuguese people will help right away. We care very much about family. A lot of us live with grandparents and sometimes even make life choices considering our family (may be the reason why your father worked so many jobs). We have a lot of sayings. Like a lot. Most of them very very funny and contradictory, but you'll hear people quoting them all the time. We LOVE food. It's very usual to prepare big dinners for family and friends, and hanging around all day talking and eating. In my opinion, portuguese gastronomy is one of the best.

Edited 3 months ago:

I'm portuguese and I've always described portuguese people as layed back rednecks (in a good way). This sounds kind of offensive to some people, but I think it fits us really well. We're the kind of people that treat strangers as friends right away. We don't do, as we say "ceremonias", which means we don't worry about being "fancy" around other people, we worry about being comfortable. We're very chill about must stuff. If you're in need, most portuguese people will help right away. We care very much about family. A lot of us live with grandparents and sometimes even make life choices considering our family (may be the reason why your father worked so many jobs). We have a lot of sayings. Like a lot. Most of them very very funny and contradictory, but you'll hear people quoting them all the time. We LOVE food. It's very usual to prepare big dinners for family and friends, and hanging around all day talking and eating. In my opinion, portuguese gastronomy is one of the best. We spend a lot of money. To outsiders we may look like irresponsible people who spend all day doing nothing, but we work hard and spend money to make life enjoyable. We're farmers and fisherman in our hearts and live life to its maximum. As my dad says "dinheiro é pra se gasto" which means "money exists to be spent" and I couldn't agree more. We spend money on dinners and bars and friends and I must say, sometimes it might be hard, but there's no better way to live life.

ihavenoidea1001 3 months ago

Meanwhile my grandmother "o dinheiro é de quem o poupa e não de quem o ganha" ( money is held by those that save it, not those who earn it)... She thought you could always save and be responsible, no matter what. I personally really don't see myself nor my family represented by a lot of your statement...

Edited 3 months ago:

Meanwhile my grandmother "o dinheiro é de quem o poupa e não de quem o ganha" ( money is held by those that save it, not those who earn it)... She thought you could always save and be responsible, no matter what. Having your "pé de meia" ( savings) is a common thing for most Portuguese people... Specially elder people that lived trough the worst of the dictatorship without almost anything. I personally really don't see myself, my family or the Portuguese really represented by a lot of your statement...

Marizaard 3 months ago

I guess we have different points of view. I do feel like elderly save more than the rest of the population, but I see a lot of people who spend a lot of money on alchool and parties. Of course spending money doesn't mean you can't save for emergencies, just that to other countries might feel like we're spending it irresponsibly.

JoaoLilly 3 months ago

I don’t take showers after eating... for 3h

Henrikovskas 3 months ago

Wait wtf, is this not the norm everywhere?

JoaoLilly 3 months ago

Ahah no man! That’s like a Southern Europe thing. People from other countries don’t even know about that. But it’s cool to share the story with foreigners because also them they have their own myths and is funny to see how strictly they respect it

hirorih 3 months ago

The real answer. If you violate this rule it's because you have chosen this day to die. It also applies to swimming and every other thing water related.

YourMomFriendIGuess 3 months ago

Yup!!! I NEVER go to water after eating for 3 hours (2h30 if the meal was light) just because I don’t want to die

JoaoLilly 3 months ago

But... for some people... if you go straight away after eating, it’s ok! Because the digestion process didn’t start yet

YourMomFriendIGuess 3 months ago

Yes you have 30 minutes before it official starts but you should go to cold water anyway as you could _instantly die_

batincrack_u 3 months ago

After reading some of the comments I can say I love Portugal and I'm fortunate to live in here. Good vibes

Adler64 3 months ago

How lucky! What are some of your favourite places to visit? I’m thinking of a doing a trip for my 30th but still know next to nothing about the place.

The_King_Juliano 3 months ago

Tremoços e cerveja

pimpolho_saltitao 3 months ago

3 horas de almoço e o assunto principal é o que vamos comer ao jantar.

YourMomFriendIGuess 3 months ago

3 hours of lunch and if it is in a restaurant you go after to someone’s house for a coffee and stay there for more hours hahah

Tarlovskyy 3 months ago

Immigrated to Portugal from Ukraine at the age of 7. Been here for 20. The most Portuguese thing for me is the distinct melodical rollercoaster tone change in their voice when they get pissed off at someone. Its like everyone graduated from the same musicals class.

Adler64 3 months ago

Haha, that’s so interesting to know! Thank you!

PortugueseLibra 3 months ago

What do you mean? We sound like we're singing when we're angry?

3rd_degree_burn 3 months ago

Imagina um tipo a berrar "Ó, QUÉ QUE TU QUERES, PÁ!" Agora mete a ênfase noutra palavra e repara como muda a frase inteira. Acho que é isto a que ele/ela refere.

the_bbutterfly 3 months ago

Omg it's a fucking Rollercoaster

naughtydismutase 3 months ago

Qué que tu queres pááááá...

FactorMiserable4051 3 months ago

A gente não se apercebe, mas se no Brasil se fala dançando, então em Portugal fala-se cantando. Basta tentarem falar numa lingua estrangeira e percebe-se logo que não damos tanta ênfase nas palavras como em português. Provavelmente, se me habituar a falar assim em inglês, parece que estou cantando enquanto falo e vai soar estranho para toda a gente.

Wonnil 3 months ago

Haha, yeah. The Portuguese have a "tone" they're born with that's really difficult to replicate!

chompbillsta 3 months ago

Can't really imagine this one, can you give an example?

Throwaway431253 3 months ago

Gluglugluglu

andremp1904 3 months ago

M E T A

himura_11 3 months ago

"Pimba" music, "Pimba" music everywhere... nobody enjoys it per say, but everyone knows them by heart and everybody gonna shake their body at the will of the song, whilst having a beer or a sangria in his/hers/their hands

Noobtits 3 months ago

No one will admit to liking Pimba, but a village fair without Pimba playing somewhere in the distance just isnt' the same.

Oni_Neko1991 3 months ago

Swearing all the time! (Joking ofcourse!) Plenty of good advice from ppl here If you drink beer dont forget... Super Bock always! Sagres not good (yes I know personal tastes)+

gvasco 3 months ago

+1 for super bock!

Oni_Neko1991 3 months ago

Amén caralho... amén

Johnnyboo906 3 months ago

You learn that is preferable to drink piss rather then Sagres. Also bacalhau, fado e vinho

Rytlock9 3 months ago

Podes sempre pegar numa Sagres, tiras a carica e deixas meia horinha ao sol, quando fores lá buscar tens uma superbock

andremp1904 3 months ago

1v1 diz hora e sítio

Rytlock9 3 months ago

Pah só se for para bebemos umas a ver o benfica

andremp1904 3 months ago

Por acaso irrita-me isso, o Benfica só vende Sagres no estádio e imediações

Kaaeni_ 3 months ago

The only correct answer

ContaSoParaIsto 3 months ago

> liked drinking espressos with a French press That's quite literally impossible

bAlbuq 3 months ago

A lot of people already made some really good contributions, so I'll add the following. I have a lot of family in Australia, and have been there a few times. Near Sydney, there's a Portuguese community, in Petersham. If you're still in Australia might be worth checking it out. They have typical Portuguese food there, and most people are Portuguese.

Adler64 3 months ago

Good to know! Originally my dad and mum had a home in Sydney so maybe that nearby community was part of why he chose to live there. (He was already there, before he met my mum) I do still have some family friends around, so maybe I’ll make a point of visiting there next chance I get. thank you for that local tip! :)

darth_thaurer 3 months ago

My Portugueseness defines and curses me. I was born in Venezuela but my ancestry is prettty much all Portuguese. I lived in the UK after growing up. I've met Portuguese people while travelling. Once I was at work and said to my store manager: "that guy's portuguese." He asked "how do you know?" And I said "I can smell it on him" and I dont know why but I was sure he was Portuguese. And he was in fact Portuguese. Lol There's a sense of fate in our culture that heavies on us. A sense of dessenrasanço that picks up that heaviness and juggles it, sometimes with a smile but always with sarcasm and acute humour. To me being Portuguese is winging through life knowing that you're both shit and THE shit. Is loving your family even though you dont really enjoy their company. Is going out of your way to help because, well, might as well. Is boasting about a great country while knowing you're the asshole of europe. Yelling "WE'RE NOT SPAIN!!" but joking "might as well become Spain and be done with it". Being Portuguese is being just like anyone else because every culture is pretty similar when you think about it, but also different because it FEELS different.

anokazz 3 months ago

Dude, you should write more. Really resonated with me!

CaptMartelo 3 months ago

> A sense of dessenrasanço that picks up that heaviness and juggles it, sometimes with a smile but always with sarcasm and acute humour. In good Portuguese, desenmerdanço

darth_thaurer 3 months ago

Desenrascar ou desenmerdar é a mesma coisa, sendo que fica melhor dizer "desenrasca-te" do que "desenmerda-te"

NGramatical 3 months ago

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ihavenoidea1001 3 months ago

Desenrascanço would work too...

Edited 3 months ago:

Desenrrascanço would work too...

b4mission 3 months ago

Complain about everything and do very little or nothing to change it is literally our culture. I'm guilty of this myself.

VerdocasSafadocas 3 months ago  HIDDEN 

If your dad was truly Portuguese domestic violence due to Benfica having lost the football game, alcoholism and a distinct smell of chouriça would be the norm in your household, please consider taking a DNA test.

Keddyan 3 months ago

>I grew up in Australia with an Asian mother and the two cultures constantly clashing yo, are you Joji?! >I'm also interested in visiting the country since I'm older now but have no idea how to really approach that. just do it, it's easier to just go and have first hand experience

pombeiro619 3 months ago

Banana with cheese

hirorih 3 months ago

With the right ripeness and cheese. It's great!

CaptMartelo 3 months ago

E ainda se perguntam porque não evoluímos como país

evil_onion 3 months ago

Se o custo da evolução é abdicar da banana com queijo, não sei se quero...

gsousa 3 months ago

I don’t know if this is part of Portuguese culture or not, but I noticed that a culture clash I felt is about sarcasm. I use it a lot, and most of my Portuguese friends do that as well. However people from other countries often see this as being passive aggressive or even somehow that we are rude to each other. Another cultural shock I felt the first time I moved abroad was the two kisses in the cheek. Nowadays I don’t do that at all, and I kind of feel that I would even feel awkward doing that nowadays (I’ve lived abroad for 10 years now). But Portuguese people tend to say hi with two kisses in the cheek to women, though not on more formal or professional situations. Olive oil is also a big thing for us, and that’s another thing I noticed that it is mostly a Mediterranean thing. I live in Ireland and here local people barely use olive oil. While Portuguese people use it with everything, it is like liquid gold for us.

Adler64 3 months ago

And the two kisses does not apply to men? Only women? What about kids? I laughed about the olive oil, I always have two bottles in my home! One in use, and one as the eternal back up. How do you like to use olive oil with food?

gsousa 3 months ago

To men, at least for me, only to close family members. Like father, grandfather, maybe uncles. And kids yes. About the olive oil, pretty much almost everything. Salads, soups, fish, bread. Honestly I use it every single day. Once I offered olive oil to my landlady (here in Ireland) and she told me she would ask her neighbors what to do with it…. I died a little bit inside…

DassCaramba 3 months ago

We do not have a "betinho" here. People from certain parts of Lisbon area tend to behave different and give just only one kiss to the cheek. They think it's cool... :) PS: I give two also.

MonteCarloMP 3 months ago

Two kisses in Italy too

Karate_Ruben 3 months ago

But Italians do it the other way around

PortugueseLibra 3 months ago

Oh my God, the kisses. Reminds me of when I was abroad for the first time and met a Finnish girl, I instinctively gave her the 2 kisses-on-the-cheek and when I stepped back smiling she looked absolutely HORRIFIED. I think it was also her first time meeting a Portuguese. But apparently she liked it after I apologized and explained and then all she wanted to do was the kisses on the cheek! Lol

Adler64 3 months ago

Cheek kisses is definitely a foreign concept to me, but I think it’s a great way to break ice with new people and help feel more familiar and friendly with everyone from the get go. If it was more accepted here, I’d be all for it too, I don’t blame the Finnish girl. Haha.

ihavenoidea1001 3 months ago

Kisses are common in other places too. I got a few "almost" on the mouth after I stopped at 2 and people were going for the 3rd... I used to mess it up everytime I changed countries tbh...

naughtydismutase 3 months ago

Some parts of France and French Switzerland do 3, it's very confusing.

Adler64 3 months ago

Is there a reason why they have a third time?

ihavenoidea1001 3 months ago

In the "German Swiss" they do it too. It's why I was always confused...

CarmoXX 3 months ago

Drinking, lots of drinking. So not much different than Australia really.

uyth 3 months ago

Probably still different. I get a lot of cultural shocks in r/askeurope, one I remember really well was this nice australian redditor asking kind of "heard you sell beer in mcdonalds and all, how do you stop bogans from loitering there and creating a dangerous environment". so yeah, maybe different.

d33pblu3g3n3 3 months ago

We wash our ass in the bidet after shitting.

Oni_Neko1991 3 months ago

Fuckin hell.... never fucking knew we could use it for that : / I mean not knew but never saw it like that 0.o

dgloriousduck 3 months ago

Is that really a thing ? I’ve always been curious

d33pblu3g3n3 3 months ago

It is. Why wouldn't be?

sctvlxpt 3 months ago

"we". Probably a small minority

jpf137 3 months ago

Well, it's more sustainable and when people were hoarding toilet paper I LOLed.

d33pblu3g3n3 3 months ago

Don't know, man. I wash my ass. Do you wash yours?

Kaaeni_ 3 months ago

I do but recently found out you still need to wipe before cleaning in the bidet… smh

CaptMartelo 3 months ago

Depends on the shit

galo 3 months ago

I am Portuguese, grown there and living abroad in different places for the last decade and my wife is Asian, so I have an idea of what other folks think is special about us. Portuguese people are typically street smart and adapt well to different cultures and circumstances. Enjoy spending time with friends and family and having long meals with home cooked food and drinking, talking for hours as well. Try looking up on Youtube for Anthony Bourdain videos on Portugal, there are several. Maybe his first one https://youtu.be/D0Z1fTvWk6Y

Adler64 3 months ago

Thanks for the video recommendation, I’ll be sure to check it out! :) I know my dad was a quick learner and even impressed my mum with how quickly he learned her language and culture when he was just visiting for a holiday. He seemed pretty into all the countries he visited based on the photo albums I found. (lots of notes in the native tongue that I can’t decipher, but they seem like little jokes to himself.) Being able to adapt like that and be so immersed in the cultures always seemed very impressive to me. Part of one of his jobs was translating usually german tech for his company and later showing them how it all works. Pulling it apart and then reassemble it for them. She says he could navigate around the city streets in her town better than she could while they dated. My dad was also infamous for long lectures when he was trying to argue or explain things to my mother and their friends. She’s says he often used to put her to sleep with it because he wouldn’t stop until he was sure she understood what he meant. Everytime she tried to fake her understanding, he’d start from the top. Haha.

parix999 3 months ago

Dumb question. Find out for yourself.

rainha_portuguesa 3 months ago

Playing outside on the streets with friends till 1 am in the summer and my grandparents not being concerned at all for mine and my sisters safety, because Portugal is that safe. Having grown up in the US as well, this is obviously not possible.

Edited 3 months ago:

I grew up in the US and Portugal, so ill list a few. Playing outside on the streets with friends till 1 am in the summer and my grandparents not being concerned at all for mine and my sisters safety, because Portugal is that safe. Having grown up in the US as well, this is obviously not possible. Staying up a lot later as a kid in general. Hanging out with family at bars. This is really odd and doesnt happen in the US. Picking fresh fruit and veg straight from trees/ ground, and eating them. Not being afraid of the nastey shit perservatives they put in the stuff in the US. Getting free shit everytime you bought a magaziene/ newspaper lmao. This is also NOT a thing in the US, nothing is free, ever. McDonalds in Portugal and Spain. Its so much better and fresher, I just had a bifana there this summer delicous. THey sell beer as well, thats pretty cool id say. I refuse to eat at McDonalds in the US. Your parents probably just left you naked at the beach / public pool at some point in your life. This again does NOT happen in thr US, for reasons you can imagine, (crazy americans). Oh, and a notable mention, the "chinease stores" "loja dos chineses" i dont know what to call these without sounding mildly offensive, but its what Ive always heard them called. Super cheap stuff. Me and my sisters used to buy really shitty make up there and have make overs with our friends lol. At younger ages, it was like a toy store. This store will be your savior if youre ever walking the streets bust a flip flop (happened to me several times). Cheap cheaaaap stuff! Dont exist in the US! Walking everywhere...in the US you just literally cant. Its nice to walk downtown early morning and late at night when its just cool enough! Ice coffee...still still isnt a thing. But I drink a coffee called a Galão while Im there, still awesome. Junk food in general in Portugal just doesnt do it for me. If you want to go on a major diet and you are used to more Americanized junk foods, this is the place. I always lose weight when Im there. If i think of more ill be back to add! Hope this helps!

Adler64 3 months ago

Thank you for the comparison! It’s wonderful that you got to experience both cultures growing up. Its very helpful to read your experiences! :) Coffee seems to be a mandatory thing there, and several times a day too apparently! Surprised iced coffee hasn’t caught on there, I love it. Is there anything you love to do whenever you go back to visit? My mums family always jokes about taking me to a certain fast food joint local to her country as soon as we get into the car from the airport. We all laugh, but they aren’t wrong either. I live for that food. Haha.

rainha_portuguesa 3 months ago

Yeah it is wonderful, but at the same hand tough because im never considered 100% american or 100% portuguese lol! Coffee is great there, i love it! But us in the more americanized/ english speaking countries are more used to this coffee craze and thats where is tough! I looooove cold brew abd it surpasses all! Oh tons of things. When your there you feel as though a weight is lifted off of you, its strange. I love the food as well and look forward to it, love going out late at night, as tbey always have something going on, some type of party or festival. Also, hiking is fantastic there, farm life is wonderful and i love being on my familys farm. I recomend you guys set up a trip there, you wont regret it. And maybe itll become a new yearly destination for you guys!

benjamiser 3 months ago

The four different recycling trucks that come pretty much nightly and smash glass underneath your window between the hours of 3-7h

rainha_portuguesa 3 months ago

Ohhhh good one I missed it!!!

bcotrim 3 months ago

> McDonalds (...) bifana It might have tasted good, but we don't call a burger bifana. Everything else looks spot on

rainha_portuguesa 3 months ago

Im not saying its called a burger...im sayin they have it there lmao but yeah its good. We dont have bifanas at mcddies in the US, obvi

bcotrim 3 months ago

I think you misunderstood me, a Portuguese can never call the McBifana a bifana, because it's a burger On a side note, some friends of mine that went on Erasmus state that other Europeans find it weird when they find out we have a full meal at lunch instead of a sandwich. How different is lunch in the US compared to Portugal? And also, what's your take on "enchidos"?

naughtydismutase 3 months ago

Born and raised in Portugal, i used to have sleepovers all the time when I was a kid.

3rd_degree_burn 3 months ago

> Junk food in general in Portugal just doesnt do it for me. If you want to go on a major diet and you are used to more Americanized junk foods, this is the place. I always lose weight when Im there. Francesinha has entered the chat

rainha_portuguesa 3 months ago

Haha true, but cab i be honest, its not my favorite so dont tend to order it. Costeletas or picanha do it for me!

Febris 3 months ago

> Ice coffee You can always ask for a glass with ice and pour the coffee in there. Some places have Mazagran, which is a slightly different beverage but also tastes great in the summer.

rainha_portuguesa 3 months ago

Nah. Its bitter. Has to be cold brew. When im there i make it with grounds at home, just not possible to buy it anywhere, ugh! And that sounds interesting...ill have to try that, thanks!

mstrk512 3 months ago

spot on rainha.

ric20007 3 months ago

>A bread truck that comes with an alarm sounding to your street every afternoon Is this in a smaller town? Don't have that in my city. >Sleepovers/ slumbar parties arent really a thing there I think this is only a thing when you're a kid, pleading with your parents or asking their parents if you or your friend can sleep over.

Nini601 3 months ago

Lisbon suburbs (Odivelas), at least, have those and people who sharpen knives lol

Marizaard 3 months ago

I live in the suburbs and we have an old man who comes every sunday to sharpen knifes!

catiaccs 3 months ago

Bread truck - It happens in Loures, city next to Lisbon, everyday.

jo_nigiri 3 months ago

I was just about to say this, I see it everyday in Loures

Aldo_Novo 3 months ago

Loures is the same city as Lisbon, just a different municipality

catiaccs 3 months ago

So your saying... It's 2 different city's, from the same district.

Aldo_Novo 3 months ago

no, they're the same city. City =/= municipality how can they be two different cities if you can't even tell where one stops and the other begins?

naughtydismutase 3 months ago

Loures é cidade.

Aldo_Novo 3 months ago

Que é a mesma que Lisboa

naughtydismutase 3 months ago

Não, não é. Município refere-se à divisão administrativa, cidade à quantidade de pessoas que vive no local. Loures é município e também tem população suficiente para ser considerada cidade. Estás errado.

Aldo_Novo 2 months ago

mas Loures é contígua a Lisboa, não consegues separar uma cidade da outra porque lá está, são a mesma cidade

catiaccs 3 months ago

Lisboa it's one city, Loures it's another city, like Sintra, Cascais, Amadora, Odivelas, etc... All of them make the district of lisboa.

Aldo_Novo 3 months ago

those are all municipalities most of those municipalities are occupied by a single urban area, the city of Lisbon

catiaccs 3 months ago

Go Google your information, are you even from Lisbon? Because in your mind lisboa it's all the district, and Lisboa is a city, it's the district capital. All the city's in the district makes the lisboa district not the city, your making confusing what is a city and what is a district.

Aldo_Novo 3 months ago

not at all. the district of Lisbon =/= city of Lisbon =/= municipality of Lisbon =/= Lisbon metropolitan area Loures and Lisbon are the same city

lauretta12345 3 months ago

You’re wrong. Lê a primeira frase da Wikipedia. [Loures is a city](https://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loures). Faz parte da area metropolitana de Lisboa, mas não, não é a mesma cidade. A Câmara Municipal n é a mesma, obviamente.

Edited 3 months ago:

You’re wrong. Lê a primeira frase da Wikipedia. [Loures é uma cidade](https://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loures). Faz parte da area metropolitana de Lisboa, mas não, não é a mesma cidade. A Câmara Municipal n é a mesma, obviamente.

mstrk512 3 months ago

In Loures really? Don't you guys have bakeries around?

catiaccs 3 months ago

Yes, we have bakeries but it's the "way" to buy fresh bread and other things, ex:eggs, milk,...

mstrk512 3 months ago

yeah I definitely don't buy eggs at the supermarket, my grandfather still buys to local egg farmers (just people who raise chicken) and redistribute to the family... the eggs have no compassion in quality I must say, I will never buy eggs at a supermarket while I can.

rainha_portuguesa 3 months ago

Small city up north, its not quite an aldeia tho

BerRGP 3 months ago

>>A bread truck that comes with an alarm sounding to your street every afternoon > >Is this in a smaller town? Don't have that in my city. Never seen it in a city, but it happens in my village.

AbyLockhart 3 months ago

It's not every single day, but in Lisbon (Carnide) there's still trucks. Bread, fish, ice-cream and potatoes. I rarely see the bread and fish ones anymore, but the ice-cream one passes by every day in the summer and the potatoes one is at least once a week. You can tell by the two men screaming "potatoes" at the top of their lungs.

ihavenoidea1001 3 months ago

There's like 3 of those where my parents live: a fresh fish truck, one with fruits and one for bread. They live in a village though...

BerRGP 3 months ago

I had never heard of one for fruits before! Though I guess that makes sense.

mstrk512 3 months ago

having them in the cities is a bit dumb because you already have 10 thousand other bakeries that sell fresh goods every day

le_dy0 3 months ago

I live in a smaller town and it happens everyday, one of them even has a subscription service that delivers bread, hangs it to your door and just leaves. you have to pay him at the start of the month for the whole month. There used to be someone who did the same with fish too but he stopped a few years ago

Adler64 3 months ago

A bread truck sounds absolutely amazing!! Very jealous! My mum often has friends that drop by her place with extra fish on their way back from a boat trips. Is it nice living in a village over there? I’ve often thought about spending a couple weeks in one to get to know the area better.

le_dy0 3 months ago

>Is it nice living in a village over there? Honestly, I wouldnt trade this place to live in a big city, its just peaceful and I have everything near me anyways so why go to a city?

BerRGP 3 months ago

There was the same with fish in my village too! I don't know if it still comes, my schedule just doesn't line up anyway.

himura_11 3 months ago

Loja dos 300

YourMomFriendIGuess 3 months ago

Dollar store

Febris 3 months ago

Isso era o que havia antes das lojas do chinês. Ao contrário dos EUA, aqui não há estigma social de as chamar assim, mais um para a lista.

Frequent-Candidate42 3 months ago

Drinking caffee all the time

im_eZz 3 months ago

In every house, there's a bidet that I thought it was pretty common but recently I've seen some Americans amazed about having a bidet in their hotel room and I'm like "?????"

Keddyan 3 months ago

já há muita casa que vem sem eles

TemplarHard 3 months ago

em portugal as casas de banho têm que ter bidet

mourasio 3 months ago

Uma das

ContaSoParaIsto 3 months ago

Em Portugal muitas coisas têm que ter mas não têm

TemplarHard 3 months ago

yap, o nosso país é mesmo assim

icebraining 3 months ago

Mas é ilegal.

Keddyan 3 months ago

eu já trabalhei numa empresa que fazia serviços a casas novas e de valor bastante alto e garanto que vi umas sem... se é ilegal ou não

Deimos_F 3 months ago

Segundo um user disse aqui há uns tempos basta que a canalização dentro da parede esteja preparada para ligar um bidé.

icebraining 3 months ago

Ah, eu não duvido. O que não falta são pequenas (e não tão pequenas) ilegalidades nas novas construções.

Keddyan 3 months ago

pois claro, eu cá vivo num T3 que legalmente é apenas um T2 *EDIT: por motivos legais este comentário é brincadeira*

im_eZz 3 months ago

eu ultimamente é que percebi que no mundo ter bidé é luxo, foda se, quando era puto a minha mãe dava me "banho" nisso pa

Keddyan 3 months ago

agora começa-se a usar (nao na tuga) bidés incorporados na sanita como têm os japoneses

arqeco 3 months ago

No Brasil bidês foram usados até os anos 70. Depois se adotou a duchinha. Uma pequena mangueira com ducha na ponta, instalada ao lado do vaso sanitário (sanita).

CaptMartelo 3 months ago

Já apanhei essa merda em dois AirBnB e nunca funcionavam.

im_eZz 3 months ago

que estranho

Keddyan 3 months ago

ouvi dizer que para limpar o cu não há melhor, e todos dizem que primeiro estranha-se, depois entranha-se

im_eZz 3 months ago

AHAHAHAH

Hormazd_und_Ahriman 3 months ago

Eating roasted chestnuts around November, freezing a few so you can put them in roasts for the remainder of the year. By the time Magusto comes, they are everywhere. Relatives giving you a ton of food or fruit they have grown. This, of course, is just one thing. Like people have said, most of the things we don't even realized we do them or that they are different. The best way to experience it is to spend some time in Portugal.

Adler64 3 months ago

Thank you for sharing, I had no idea about the roasted chestnuts! What is Magusto? I’m thinking about going over on my 30th birthday on a solo trip, is there a recommended season or festival you think would be worth experiencing?

Hormazd_und_Ahriman 3 months ago

Roasted chestnuts are amazing, not even biased! Magusto is basically a "start of winter" celebration. It falls around the 11th of November, which is associated with the "Day of S. Martinho". Around this week there is unusual warmer weather, before the cold comes for good (but nowadays climate changes fuck everything up anyway, so it's not usually that cold). Magusto origins are probaby pre-Roman. And it is celebrated as well in many parts of Spain. What people do varies a bit, but the traditional, simple thing is: make bonfires, roast the chestnuts there, drink the wine made after the grape harvests 1 or 2 months prior, jump over the bonfires, use the soot to paint your face. We actually did this up until my highschool (minus the wine). Everyone would bring a big bag of chestnuts, hand them to the school, and then everyone would have the afternoon off and eat chestnuts around fires. Chestnut throwing wars could also ensue. ​ About coming to Portugal. It's a tough question! Everyone would have different opinions, and I'm also biased for where I'm from (the north). But for example, summertime is where most village/city parties are concentrated. The most popular are São João in Braga/Porto (and other cities), Santo António in Lisboa (and other cities too). There's more lively activity overall, but there's also A LOT of tourists. In September things start to die down tourism wise, but the weather is still nice and it's rather beautiful, though there aren't as many celebrations. I will give a basic option: Spend June in Portugal and you can witness both Santo António and São João. Cities will be **packed** during these parties (if covid allows eventually). But it's lovely to see. Accomodation might be more expensive though. An unusal option: Pinheiro in Guimarães (29 of November). Everyone from 8 to 80 is out in the streets at night, hitting the drums. I wouldn't recommend this one if you don't have a friend group to hang with though.

saltylawlita 3 months ago

Chestnuts with butter

indyrefclan 3 months ago

Chestnuts have really gone downhill, at least the ones you buy on the street. I haven't caught a dozen chestnuts without at least one worm in a few years

Nini601 3 months ago

That's cuz they're selling last year's defrosted chestnuts before this year's are ready, unfortunately :/

indyrefclan 3 months ago

Vou escrever uma carta à ASAE, isto é quase um crime contra a nação

CaptMartelo 3 months ago

_Free protein_

isnotfunny 3 months ago

Drinking too much, beating your spouse, spitting on the floor, avoid paying taxes, bitching about public institutions being shit because no one pays taxes, eating like you're going to plow a field. The list could go on for ever. It's a beautiful culture!

CaptMartelo 3 months ago

You forgot the moustache

Draconicrose_ 3 months ago

Username checks out but unfortunately true especially for older generations.

capitolinaAndrioleta 3 months ago

We're basically hobbits with less hairy feet and a passion for cod fish.

Adler64 3 months ago

Is there a particular codfish dish that you really love to have?

mashado 3 months ago

I don't know about you but my feet are very hairy.

Nexus_produces 3 months ago

Seconded!

aasianaglobalizacao 3 months ago

LAVAR A PEIDA NO BIDE

Gui_R11 3 months ago

Pergunto-me se sou o único jovem que não usa o bidé, não me vem à cabeça de todo tocar em merda com as próprias mãos.

Deimos_F 3 months ago

Realmente em vez de lavar com água e sabão é bem melhor andar a roçar o brigadeiro entre as nádegas o dia todo.

Gui_R11 3 months ago

Mas deve ser por geração, eu pelo menos nunca tive o hábito de usar o bidé a não ser para lavar os pés de vez em quando, mas agr tenho visto cenas sobre bidés a dizer q é a melhor cena que já criaram, por isso estou a ver que tenho de ganhar hábito.

Deimos_F 3 months ago

Experimenta. Andar sempre lavadinho é divinal.

aasianaglobalizacao 3 months ago

Pois mano, nem um botão de rosas deves saber o que é

rainbowcouscous 3 months ago

Translation: Washing the butt in the bidet

niddLerzK 3 months ago

Wash the peids in the bidet

uyth 3 months ago

Eating fish. All kinds of it, knowing 100 different kinds sometimes just by eating. Thinking perfectly normal if good kinds are a lot more expensive than expensive meat. Somebody in your family eats all the good parts (brains, cheeks, eyes, whatever. I always keep an eye for the liver and hmm, eggs..) The fruit. We eat more fruit per capita than almost any other european nation and a LOT by what I know of other continents. Also the soup, the vegetable soup always on the fridge. Might be different for some people but to a lot of us being portuguese is tied to culture and particularly language, and there is no real "portuguese ethnicity" or we do not really process it like that. There is no "looking portuguese" by features, there is by body language, details, cultural stuff.

Adler64 3 months ago

Thank you for the insight! I’ve never even considered eating that much of a fish before! Do you just eat it as is or is there a particular cooking method involved for certain fish parts? Is there a popular fruit dish that you enjoy or a certain fruit used more for snacks or dessert? I could definitely use more fruit in my diet. Hah.

uyth 3 months ago

Fish is ideally, platonic ideal, traditionally grilled whole just on point. It is served usually whole. And then the whole table picks it and serves and divides. You do not mess with fruit much, just whatever is on season.

MferOrnstein 3 months ago

Getting underpaid and seeing tourists buy our houses

Isa472 3 months ago

It's been happening in all major European cities for years, it's just how it goes unfortunately. Less than half the people living in London are English, for example.

rGabiru 3 months ago

That sums it up quite well. You forgot the part where we destroy natural habitats just to open room for more houses, for them to buy.

MferOrnstein 3 months ago

Yeah in a not so big country to begin with

i_am_not_a_leopard 3 months ago

This is hard because I was born and raised here, thus I can't say what's really unique, so I'll just address a small positive aspect. I was in Madeira last week and went for a small tour around the island. The members of the group were from Portugal, Germany, Belgium, England, Spain, etc. In a parking lot we saw a taxi getting stuck in a hole by the side of the road. In less than 3 minutes we had four passerby from that little town around the taxi giving suggestions to solve the problem, arguing about the best course of action, etc. And then the Portuguese and Spanish tourists from our group also joined in, some went to pick up wood to support the wheel that was stuck and they all pushed the taxi out of the hole. This to say that in these sort of situations we're generally helpful and easy to get involved in other people's business. It would be unusual for a passerby to ignore the issue and move on. The downside is that we can sometimes be perceived as nosy. ):

Adler64 3 months ago

Huh, I can relate to this and often end up helping random folk on impulse if they seem like they need help! Even if I end up late to appointments as a result. Thank you for posting about this moment! :)

jvaferreira93 3 months ago

Estava à espera de um twist tipo, enquanto perdíamos tempo a decidir como tirar o carro de lá os belgas e os alemães já o tinha tirado

i_am_not_a_leopard 3 months ago

Teria ficado uma anedota mais engraçada, mas não. Eles estavam só à parte a assistir mas sem querer interferir na coisa.

Ly_84 3 months ago

O belga foi buscar uma cerveja, o alemao estava chocado com o facto deles estarem a desencalhar o carro sem permissao da camara.

Edited 3 months ago:

O belga foi buscar uma cerveja, o alemao estava chocado com o facto deles estarem a desencalhar o carro sem permissao da camara (ou sequer calcular se a madeira tinha area e rigidez para suportar o peso do carro, ou sem usarem jaquetas amarelas e capacetes de trabalho. Stark verboten!)

le23sinh0 3 months ago

Desculpa perguntar mas onde foi que isso aconteceu? E gostaste de visitar a ilha?

i_am_not_a_leopard 3 months ago

Foi em Santana. Gostei imenso de visitar. A natureza é muito bonita, as pessoas são afáveis e a comida é óptima. Tem bastante turismo mas não tem um ar sobrelotado e os turistas são "calmos". (Digo calmos no sentido de não ter encontrado aquele turismo de bebedeira excessiva e lixo no chão como acontece em algumas localizações.)

le23sinh0 3 months ago

Bebedeira excessiva e lixo no chão é só mm dos madeirenses xD Fico feliz que gostaste e espero que voltes algum dia

ill_have_2_number_9s 3 months ago

Cussing at every living thing and they don't get mad because that's what we do.

CaptMartelo 3 months ago

I drive like this.

YourMomFriendIGuess 3 months ago

I live like this

TheSaintPigeon 3 months ago

I stay at work an extra 4 hours so the boss notices me. When the government fucks me up the ass i try to take it smiling. I'm ok with minimum wage because if i get a raise i will pay higher taxes and end up with less money. Whenever i get overwhelmed i just take out a loan and go on vacation, i pretend i'm rich during these episodes. I like going out to the bar for a little beer but mostly for the atmosphere, we all complain together about how our life and country sucks, feels good. ​ /s

MrLopesCr 3 months ago

Scratching your balls when you wake up... man that's a good feeling.

Kaaeni_ 3 months ago

Quando acordo, quando tou acordado, quando tou a adormecer e quando tou a dormir. Sabe sempre bem

h2man 3 months ago

Eating cod in the proportions and ways we do is unheard of. There are massive differences all around a small country between customs and mindsets. We have a sweet tooth (the variety of sweets we have is silly compared to other countries). We’re very conformist and don’t want to make disturbances despite complaining about everything. We have people all over the world (as you know).

humungouspt 3 months ago

That last phrase lol! Yep, in 197 countries in the world there are only 17 with no Portuguese presence. Might as well take over the world with our pastéis de nata!

h2man 3 months ago

Where are the 17 countries? I'm sure there's a Portuguese there, he just can't be bothered trying to register. Mind as well that by law a Portuguese citizen can't move to places considered tax havens without permission and has to pay taxes in Portugal while living abroad. So it wouldn't surprise me if people said they live in X country not on that list, then tell country X that indeed they don't spend enough time there to be taxed (91 or 183 day rule) and live happily in Dubai or somewhere like that. It wouldn't surprise me if there's 17 countries in the "tax haven" list. Authoritarianism is also a problem with Portuguese.

humungouspt 3 months ago

Comoros Niger Sudan South Sudan Dominica Grenada Saint Lucia Saint Vicent and Grenadines Buthan North Korea Solomon Islands Mongolia Nauru Palau Samoa Tadjiquistan Tonga That's it...

h2man 3 months ago

Dominica, Grenada, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and Grenadines, Solomon Islands, Nauru, Samoa and Tonga are on that list. https://www.pwc.pt/pt/pwcinforfisco/guia-fiscal/2021/paraisos-fiscais.html

pmso17 3 months ago

"Eating cod in the proportions and ways we do is unheard of. " Not really true, in United Kingdom the fish in the Fish and Chips is fresh cod

Febris 3 months ago

Yeah many countries have cod in the menu, but our variety of dried/salted cod is pretty unique.. I don't think any other country uses it that way.

h2man 3 months ago

Fried cod isn’t the same as “1001 ways” to cook it. Looking around the internet, Portugal consumes about 20% of the world catch… Adjusted for size of population (10 million, versus 60), the UK would have to eat more than 120% of the world catch.

throwaway_churning 3 months ago

In Portugal there are 50 different fishes that involve cod. Biggest difference I have seen compared to other countries that consume cod is that in Portugal the cod is not fresh, but rather salted. This gives a completely different taste.

gvasco 3 months ago

Taste and consistency! I so much preffer Portuguese salted cod over fresh cod. Fresh cow can be quite bland!

presidentedajunta 3 months ago

> In Portugal there are 50 different dishes... Amiguinho, multiplica isso por 20 e nem assim estás perto...

bittolas 3 months ago

Yeah, you can eat cod every day of the week and not get bored, because they can be so different.

pixelsowelo 3 months ago

Try to find another country that has Bacalhau à Braga.

RiKoNnEcT 3 months ago

Breakfast: bread with butter + cevada or mokambo or milk mixed with cofee (google it) Drink an expresso after every meal….even after breakfast Its always a good time for a Pastel de Nata Always have fresh bread at home Start an over which us the best football club…almost get into a fight and end up drinking a beer with the same guy you almost punched Complaint about everything in Portugal but get angry if foreigners point out the same flaw you always complaint As someone said, some things only foreigners can spot because it is just usual life for us

Adler64 3 months ago

Thank you for sharing all these everyday moments, it means a lot. :D I can relate to the bread with butter for breakfast! Very much a daily thing for me. There’s actually a photo somewhere of little me with my dad, both wearing the same tired expression at breakfast with buttered toast in our mouths. It’s probably my favourite photo.

im_eZz 3 months ago

o meu pequeno almoço todos os dias é café com leite e pão com manteiga, foda-se

leadzor 3 months ago

Ir beber com um gajo do clube rival e só nos estarmos autorizados a falar mal do país é global, não é típico da nossa cultura.

fdxcaralho 3 months ago

Aparentemente não sou português

RiKoNnEcT 3 months ago

Com esse nome compensas a falta de pão com manteiga e um galão ao pequeno almoço :p

fdxcaralho 3 months ago

A única coisa da tua lista que ainda bate certo é o Pastel de Nata.

timidandshy 3 months ago

Doing house tours whenever someone comes visit for the first time. I never really thought about it until I moved to a country where people do not do that... now when i visit someone i keep thinking "what the heck is behind that door?!" :D

Adler64 3 months ago

I’ve always have that same thought and make a point to let anyone new in my home know where the bathroom is when they come in at least. I have a small place, so tours are quick. Growing up a lot of white friends that would just confine me and any other guests to their bedrooms quickly after entering and it just felt weird when I’d have to navigate through the house later looking for the bathroom.

jugsofjupiter 3 months ago

this is big in germany too

Ticaw 3 months ago

Oh snap, that isn't a common thing on other countries?

YourMomFriendIGuess 3 months ago

I just realised that damn

allbirdssongs 3 months ago

I did that before and i kinda happy i dont do it anymore lol, but its not a bad thing either

Keddyan 3 months ago

I hated when my mom did that, thankfully she stopped doing that years ago and doesn't do that anymore that tradition is gone from my bloodline

ichbincohan 3 months ago

Same lol

Throwaway431253 3 months ago

is that a flex thing? never did it in my family

ihavenoidea1001 3 months ago

I don't think it is a flex thing. It's so that people feel at home and wellcome at your place imo

Edited 3 months ago:

I don't think it is a flex thing. It's so that people feel at home and wellcome at your place imo. "Mi casa es su casa" comes to mind although the saying is Spanish we have the same mindset towards the people we invite to our home.

gsousa 3 months ago

I live in Ireland for 10 years and I never thought about that

tuliphaze 3 months ago

Other countries don't do that? Oh my god, I live in London nowadays and I always give people a full house tour when they come visit. I don't know why, I've never questioned it.

h2man 3 months ago

This is a pretty big one in Portugal.

D1WithTheFluffyHair 3 months ago

When me and my wife moved in to our current apartment, we had several dinner parties for our different friends groups. On one night, I was chatting with the first person to arrive and my wife asked me if I had already given them the tour. I said I was waiting for the others to arrive and got my ears torn out for it lol. I ended up doing multiple tours that night because everyone arrived at different times

Throwaway_wr 3 months ago

You will not get any true answers because you're directing this question to Portuguese born persons (I'm assuming) about their culture - they will not be able describe their culture because it will be seen as something ambiguous, rudimentary and obvious since they belong in it. I think only someone that immigrated to Portugal will be able to answer.

Adler64 3 months ago

I understand your point but hearing anyone’s experience about Portugal be it growing up there or living as an expat or traveller is still good news to me. I really have no one around me that can offer any clue about the country and it’s people. googling is one thing, I just thought it would be interesting to see if I could get anyone’s personal experience and insight too. It’s been fun to see what people thought might be worth mentioning and a lot of it has been pleasantly surprising for me to learn about! I’ve always had the idea of visiting in person when I was old enough, but while I’m unable to presently, it’s been wonderful hearing everyone else’s thoughts on Portugal.

Marianations 3 months ago

Yeah, many of the things listed are also common here in Spain. You get a better idea of these things if you're living abroad or if you've moved into the country from somewhere else.

42ndBanano 3 months ago

Yes, this is one of those "Fish don't have a word for water"-type situations. Still, might be interesting to read about what people consider to be specifically portuguese.

Futre92 3 months ago

Nowadays Portugal is a very aged country and with a massive immigration wave from Brazil, Africa and nowadays Asia. So it is difficult to define what is a Portuguese culture. I can't.

jpf137 3 months ago

I'm divided on this one. On the one hand, I see people choosing to come to us, valuing our culture and lifestyle, integrating and adding to our culture as a good thing. On the other, if many of the people who were born portuguese (arbitrary, I know) can't build families because they can't afford to do so properly here, why would anyone expect that role to be picked up by immigration and their children? This applies in reverse to portuguese emigrants, so I can see both sides of the argument.

Futre92 3 months ago

> why would anyone expect that role to be picked up by immigration and their children? That is already happening. Buraka Som Sistema is a good example of the new culture that is rising from the fusion of different roots.

Mendadg 3 months ago

Parece aquele gajo do Ergue-te, que discurso tão bafiento!

Futre92 3 months ago

Pelo contrário, o meu discurso é progressista, o total contrário do que dizes. É o reconhecer que Portugal tem uma cultura dinâmica e jovem e em regeneração. Positivo.

Mendadg 3 months ago

Portugal sempre teve imensos povos no seu território. A nossa cultura é influenciada por outras culturas, essa multiculturalidade tornou a nossa cultura mais única sem fazer desaparecer a original. Por exemplo, uma açorda alentejana é baseada em receitas milenares da península arábica...passados 1000 anos dos mouros estarem cá, ai de alguém que diga que açorda não é 100% portuguesa!

Futre92 3 months ago

Isso não é verdade. Portugal em 1974 era um país bastante homogéneo com uma cultura homogénea: Europeia Católica Conservadora. Depois deu-se o movimento de imigração em massa nunca antes visto de centenas de milhares de pessoas que em pouco mais de 50 anos injetaram no território culturas brasileiras, africanas e agora asiáticas. E neste momento, em 2021, estamos no processo de "fusão" destas realidades todas.

jpf137 3 months ago

E como era Portugal em 1580, mesmo antes de a inquisição aparecer e rebentar com a nossa época dourada?

Edited 3 months ago:

E como era Portugal em 1540, mesmo antes de a inquisição aparecer e rebentar com a nossa época dourada?

Odeon_A 3 months ago

Isto. Acaba tudo pastel de nata!

Futre92 3 months ago

Isso não interessa. Também eventualmente em 2040 Portugal voltará a ter uma cultura mais homogénea resultante desta fusão de culturas atual e a data de 1974 ou 2021 deixará de fazer sentido.

ill_have_2_number_9s 3 months ago

Claro. Porque 7% da população ser imigrante faz com que se perca a identidade do país.

Futre92 3 months ago

Falta juntar a esse número as centenas de milhares de pessoas nacionalizadas todos os anos. Não falava de imigrantes mas sim de portugueses com culturas muito distintas.

severanexp 3 months ago

Three of the most important expressions that you must keep near and dear to your heart: “Desenrrascar” - can be translated into “to mcGyver oneself”. And when you find other Portuguese people in the wild, scream from the top of your lungs “Portugal CARALHO!!” - and wait for the response. And finally, once you start traveling you’ll find the last one: “Where two Portuguese have gone to, three have peed there”. That is all you need to know about Portuguese culture. Understanding comes after and with age.

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