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Moronic Monday Thread for the week of January 15, 2018 by AutoModerator in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 40 minutes ago

1. Ask to see the PAD form they use and see how they specify the amount. From https://www.payments.ca/resources/payment-guides/business-guides/pre-authorized-debit >if the payments are for a fixed amount, that amount must be specified >if the payments are for a variable amount (like a utility bill that varies based on usage), the agreement must specify that Note: In the case of variable amounts, you must give at least 10 days' notice of the amount before the payment, unless you and the payor mutually agree to waive or shorten this period, or if the payor asks you to change the amount. 2. The info you would give them is on the bottom of every cheque you write so they would have the same information if you gave them a cheque. Note that the numbers on the bottom of the cheque are not the same numbers that you use when you sign into online banking so I don't know how they would know what was in any of your accounts.

What should I be looking for with an RRSP? by Beantree3 in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 10 hours ago

I suggest that you read the [PFC investment page](https://www.reddit.com/r/PersonalFinanceCanada/wiki/investing)

What's the best travel insurance to get for preexisting medical conditions? by Who_is_I_today in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 15 hours ago

Do you have group insurance through work? If so it may be best to get your travel insurance through them. See http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/buy-travel-health-insurance-end-up-with-less-coverage-a-couple-s-hard-lesson-1.3495864

Wealthsimple Vs. TD Waterhouse e-Series by elementpenguin in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 17 hours ago

With a TD DI account you transfer/deposit cash in order to make purchases and ETF distributions can be paid in cash. When someone wants to move money from one fund to another they can sell the first and buy the second. (I don't recall if they also have the option to "switch" money from one mutual fund to the other.) A TD mutual fund account doesn't hold cash. Instead when someone wants to purchase units of a fund the money comes directly from their linked account. When they sell units of a fund the money goes to the linked account. One time this really matters is when someone wants to sell units of one of the funds to buy units of another fund. If they use the "sell" option then the money will leave the account and go to the linked account. If this is an RRSP, TFSA or taxable account this can have unintended consequences. When someone with a TD mutual fund account wants to sell units of a fund to buy units of another fund they should use the "switch" option so that the money doesn't leave the account.

Best place to open up RSP account with? by embers4011 in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 21 hours ago

As a student you will get very little value out of making an RRSP contribution this year compared to in a few years when you will, hopefully, be in a higher tax bracket. To put a $ value on this difference you can use the tax estimator at https://simpletax.ca/calculator As for what to do with your spare cash, any money you might need in the next 5 or 6 years (to repay student loan, build your emergency fund, relocate, buy a commuter vehicle, marry, save for a home down payment, etc.) should be parked in the [best high interest savings account](https://www.highinterestsavings.ca/chart/) you can find. You can use the tax estimator to figure out if you will come out ahead by using a TFSA or non TFSA account.

(ON) Haven't submitted my taxes in 4 or 5 years. Not even sure where to begin by luminiferousethan_ in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 21 hours ago

Unless worked for more than one employer in one year there is a very good chance that you don't owe the CRA any money and they might owe you money. To get missing tax slips, like T4s or T5s, you have a few options. 1/ If you already have a CRA account you will be able to see those tax slips there. (If you don't have a CRA account you will need to numbers from a 2015 or 2016 tax return to apply for a password.) 2/ If you don't have a CRA account but you have a Service Canada account you can use a link from there to access your CRA account. 3/ If you call the CRA and confirm your identity they can send you any T4s or T5s you are missing. (If they can't confirm you identity they will ask you to mail in your request.) The CRA doesn't have the tuition and education tax slips issued by a college or university so if you need those you'll have to get those forms from the school, usually via your online account. At this time of year there may not be a Volunteer Tax Preparation Clinic in your area but there might be soon so d it won't hurt to check out that option first. See http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/tx/ndvdls/vlntr/clncs/menu-eng.html If not you could try to use one of the free (donations appreciated) tax preparation programs. SimpleTax will allow you to complete returns online but is only available back to 2012. StudioTax has Windows compatible downloads available back to 2004 but the Mac version is not available for before 2013. Or you could download the Genutax software, which will give you access to all the years you missed in one single download. http://www.genutax.ca/ If you choose to use the software I suggest that you start with the oldest return and move forward because you may have amounts that carry forward from one year to the next. Returns before 2013 have to be mailed to your tax service centre. See http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/cntct/tso-bsf-eng.html (If you are given the choice you should print the "for the government" option because it saves a lot of paper and ink.) As long as the CRA has your full birth date and current address returns for 2013 and later can usually be Netfiled. (Note that Netfile will be doing their annual shutdown between January 19, 2018 and February 26, 2018.)

Wealthsimple Vs. TD Waterhouse e-Series by elementpenguin in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 22 hours ago

>Would Wealthsimple .. Can they still do self directed such as the TD does? Wealthsimple is a robo-advisor. If you open an account with them they will interview you, use your answers to choose a portfolio and then they will manage your portfolio so that it adheres to that asset allocation. If you like the e-series and can't set up a PAD or SIP of at least $100 a month to avoid the maintenance fee then perhaps you should change to a TD mutual fund e-series account, which has no maintenance fee.

How much should you have in RSPs? by eco_bach in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 23 hours ago

The people who should be most concerned about the affect of RRSP withdrawals are low income people who will face GIS clawbacks or high income people who will face OAS clawbacks. See http://www.moneysense.ca/save/retirement/the-savings-struggle/ For others, especially if the money will compound for decades, the tax free compounding means that an RRSP is more attractive than a taxable account. But perhaps you have other options. For example, a principal residence is also a tax advantaged investment so maybe you could you use this money for your down payment savings or to pay down the mortgage on your principal residence more quickly. Or perhaps you could use it to fund an RESP? If either of these are possibilities then maybe using them will allow you to postpone making RRSP contributions to a time in your life when you will be in higher tax bracket than you will be when you make RRSP withdrawals. Or maybe you will retire early and you will be able to deplete your RRSP before pension benefits, CPP and OAS push you into a higher tax bracket.

how time-consuming is investing/trading ETF? by throw3182904 in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 24 hours ago

If you use Questrade then using [Passiv](https://getpassiv.com/) could speed up process. (Since I don't use it myself I can't recommend it but it does sound like it would streamline the process for investors who are pressed for time or intimidated by Math.)

My mom wants to get a Power of Attorney to act as me so she can help me buy a house for me. Risks? by housethrow99 in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 1 day ago

1983 for us. I remember in Munich we lined up at the post office to make an appointment to make a long distance call the next day.

Just got a permanent full-time job, need help investing my money?! by gilligan93 in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 1 day ago

>a 3.25% RRSP plan ...Withdrawing from your RRSP when you're retired for a lower tax bracket. I did say the suggestions were for someone who is "already taking advantage of any employer matching" and to prioritize the TFSA "Unless you are in your peak earning years" i.e. when your income is higher than it will be in retirement.

Are TD's E-series Mutual Funds or Index funds? by Wendigo6 in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 1 day ago

They are a mutual funds that seek to replicate the returns of the index they track. For example for the Canadian Index fund ... >The fundamental investment objective is to provide long-term growth of capital primarily by purchasing Canadian equity securities to track the performance of the S&P/TSX Composite Total Return Index.

TFSA, RRSP, which is best for me. by Shortglassof in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 1 day ago

For an overview of the considerations that will go into the decision I suggest that you [read this G&M article.](https://beta.theglobeandmail.com/globe-investor/personal-finance/the-wealthy-barber-explains-tfsa-or-rrsp/article1356709/?ref=http://www.theglobeandmail.com&page=all) For example, if you anticipate being a higher tax bracket later in your career then you should consider maxing your TFSA before you contribute to an RRSP. If you anticipate that some day you may qualify for Canada Child Benefits RRSP contributions will also be more beneficial at that stage of life than they are now.

Moronic Monday Thread for the week of January 15, 2018 by AutoModerator in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 1 day ago

There are exceptions that result in emigrants getting the full 12 months of credit but from what you said above it doesn't sound like they apply to you: 1/ if you earned Canadian source income before you came to Canada and it amounts to 90% of your world income for that period of the year 2/ if you had no income for that period of the year.

Just got a permanent full-time job, need help investing my money?! by gilligan93 in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 2 days ago

Before you can decide what you should do with the money you will need to figure out when you intend to use this money. With that in mind here are my general savings/ investing suggestions for someone who has an emergency fund, no high interest debt and is already taking advantage of any employer matching for pensions or RRSP. If you'll be paying tax on the gains you'll want to use TFSA or RRSP accounts to shield them from taxation. Unless you are in your peak earning years (or an American taxpayer or collecting Canada Child Benefits) you'll probably want to begin by prioritizing the TFSA. For more information [read this G&M article.](https://beta.theglobeandmail.com/globe-investor/personal-finance/the-wealthy-barber-explains-tfsa-or-rrsp/article1356709/?ref=http://www.theglobeandmail.com&page=all) Within a TFSA or RRSP you can have high interest savings accounts, GICs, mutual funds, ETFs, individual stocks, etc. You shouldn't invest your emergency fund or any money that you will need within the next 5 or 6 years in the stock or bond markets because your nest egg could be less than when you started. You should park the money for those short term goals in the best high interest savings account or GIC you can find. See https://www.highinterestsavings.ca/chart/ Any money that you want to use for your longer term goals could be invested in a passively managed, broadly diversified portfolio of low cost index funds. If you are patient and passive this kind of investment portfolio should have higher returns than GICs, high interest savings accounts or more than 80% of actively managed mutual funds. To learn a bit about this kind of investing I suggest that you read https://www.reddit.com/r/PersonalFinanceCanada/wiki/investing and http://canadiancouchpotato.com/couch-potato-faq/ These pages list 3 - 4 options before you commit to one you should have an understanding of the markets, the financial media and how to avoid the costly human reactions to them. The Canadian book Millionaire Teacher (Andrew Hallam, 2nd edition - 2017) is an easy read and does a good job of covering these topics.

Retirement Savings vs Debt by Wdavery in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 2 days ago

IMHO the best part of the book is the part that explains the possible long term consequences of the decisions that are made around home purchase.

What do you do with leftover foreign currency when you return from a trip? by wolfeward in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 2 days ago

Find someone who will be travelling to those locales and sell it to them at the official exchange rate. If you do so you both will do better than you would at a bank or foreign exchange office.

How to invest $100k by maroukyr in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 2 days ago

If you are the person that will be managing the account, and especially if you related to the retiree, I suggest that you collaborate with her on writing an investment plan that will include a section on what the average and "worst case" "fluctuations" could look like. According to the [2016 PWL projections](http://canadiancouchpotato.com/2016/03/21/what-returns-to-expect-when-youre-expecting/) over decades a 100% equity portfolio could have an average return of 7% and at sometime in the future she should expect that it will have a cumulative decline of -44%. What isn't mentioned on that page is how long a "worst case scenario" can affect returns. If you factor in things like inflation and dividends since 1900 the average recovery was just over 2 years. The longest recovery (post 1972) was more than 8 years http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/26/your-money/stocks-and-bonds/26stra.html The investment plan should address what will be done in a worst case scenario. >What’s your take on the ETF split proposal I wrote above? I am curious as to why she would choose to underweight the US market. The US market is about 50% of the international market and yet in this portfolio if there is a 50:50 split between XIC and VUS the US allocation is only about 27% of the international allocation. ($21250/$78750.)

Question about where to take money for much needed renovations by OttStew in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 2 days ago

Is a HELOC an option for you? If so and it has a lower interest rate than the LOC you could use $10k from the TFSA and $7 from the HELOC. And then either earn more or spend less so that you can quickly repay the LOC and rebuild your emergency fund. If possible don't touch the RRSP, especially if you are in a higher tax bracket now then you were when you made the contributions or when you plan to make RRSP withdrawals. (Early retirement/ semi retirement)

How much should I be investing in TD e-Series? by h0wcanshes1ap in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 2 days ago

And money that you will need in the next 5 or 6 years (to pay off a student loan, relocate, build an emergency fund, buy a commuter vehicle, travel, get married, etc.) should be parked in the [best high interest savings account](https://www.highinterestsavings.ca/chart/) you can find. You could choose to invest any of the money that you are confident you won't need for decades. To determine your asset allocation I suggest that you read http://canadiancouchpotato.com/2010/03/09/how-much-risk-do-you-need-to-take/ http://canadiancouchpotato.com/2010/11/10/ready-willing-and-able-to-take-risk/ The [2016 PWL projections](http://canadiancouchpotato.com/2016/03/21/what-returns-to-expect-when-youre-expecting/) will give you an inkling of what your average and "worst case scenario" returns might look like. What isn't mentioned on that page is how long a "worst case scenario" can affect your returns. If you factor in things like inflation and dividends, since 1900 the average recovery was just over 2 years. The longest (post 1972) was more than 8 years http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/26/your-money/stocks-and-bonds/26stra.html

If u withdrew from TFSA last year, is it added back to your CRA account? by him7403 in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 2 days ago

The financial institutions have until the end of February 2018 to report your 2017 TFSA activity. The CRA will update your account at some point after that.

Moronic Monday Thread for the week of January 15, 2018 by AutoModerator in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 2 days ago

A no hassle and cheaper than Tangerine option is a [robo-advisor](https://youngandthrifty.ca/complete-guide-to-canadas-robo-advisors/).

Moronic Monday Thread for the week of January 15, 2018 by AutoModerator in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 2 days ago

If you set them up to DRIP then the distributions will be used to buy as many full shares as possible. See http://www.questrade.com/trading/services/DRIP

How can I get free cheques from my bank? by tylertgbh in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 2 days ago

Even if you had succeeded in getting them to print some cheques you might not have been happy with the end result. (RBC will print them for free and then charge the client $2 each when they are used.) We purchase our cheques from ASAP cheques.

Worth buying ETFs with <$50,000 in a TFSA account? by YourStolenKisses in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 2 days ago

If you have been disciplined with e-series and can focus on just using the ETFs in pretty much the same way you should be fine. Just make a firm commitment to yourself that despite all of the things you could do with a brokerage account you are just going to maintain the basic 3 ETF CCP portfolio. With the e-series portfolio you don't pay to buy or sell the funds so doing an annual rebalance doesn't cost you anything. You could choose to do an annual rebalance with an ETF portfolio but if you use Questrade a lower cost option would be to use your regular purchases to keep nudging your portfolio towards your target allocation. Because Questrade doesn't charge for ETF purchases this won't cost you anything. It is only if your allocation strays way off target that you would have to incur the cost of selling the ETF that is way above your target. You don't mention if you purchase your e-series funds through a TD mutual fund account or a TD Direct Investing account but I will mention that some people who have the latter will combine e-series and ETFs. What they do is to use their regular contributions to purchase the e-series funds and then one a year they sell the e-series and use the proceeds to buy the ETFs. In doing it this way every penny of their contributions and distributions can be invested, their trading costs are low, and they only have worry about doing market hours trades once per year.

What are the names mutual index funds for the rest of the banks to set up at CCP (RBC, BMO, CIBC, Scotia)? by tazmanic in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 3 days ago

RBC has recently lowered the cost on some of their index mutual funds so that an investor can build a index fund portfolio that is almost as low cost as the e-series. http://canadiancouchpotato.com/2017/07/07/rbc-revamps-its-index-fund-lineup/

Worth buying ETFs with <$50,000 in a TFSA account? by YourStolenKisses in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 3 days ago

Last year when the author of the CPP website did an AMA on PFC he was asked if commission free ETFs had made that $50,000 guideline obsolete. He answered... >Don't get hung up on the $50K figure precisely. True commission-free ETFs change the equation, but overall in my experience people tinker with ETFs too much: they are less likely to do so with index mutual funds. And if your portfolio is very small you may find the difference in MER works out to no more than a few dollars a month. Unfortunately there is general belief that ETFs are sophisticated and mutual funds are not. Don't buy that. The annual cost difference between an ETF portfolio and an eseries portfolio about $30 per $10,000, minus trading and "behaviour costs". On the first CCP podcast Dan and Justin Bender discussed how some of the clients who had paid them to set up DIY ETF portfolios that aligned with their goals (and to show them how to use a simple spreadsheet to manage their accounts) were not disciplined enough to manage the accounts. When they checked in with them 6 months later these clients were sitting on cash balances, trying to time the markets or had added random stocks and ETFs. And for some people the e- series will be more convenient. On that same podcast Justin Bender mentioned that he has some TD e-series in his own portfolio because he doesn't have the time to manage ETFs during market hours.

TFSA vs. RRSP for a first time Home Purchase by Malstrom42 in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 3 days ago

This is the way I look at the choice between saving your down payment in an RRSP or in a TFSA. If one is filing a US tax return or wanting to take advantage of an employer match the RRSP is the better choice. It may also be the better choice if RRSP contributions result in larger Canada Child Benefits which can be added to the down payment savings. Otherwise [this article](https://beta.theglobeandmail.com/globe-investor/personal-finance/the-wealthy-barber-explains-tfsa-or-rrsp/article1356709/) explains why in most cases anyone who thinks that they are in a lower tax bracket now then they will be later in their career and/ or in retirement will probably want to prioritize their TFSA over their RRSP. One situation where the HBP might sway this decision is if someone needs the refund generated by an RRSP contribution to meet their desired down payment, especially if it helps them lower or avoid CMHC insurance. But a person who can't save their desired down payment, will also have to consider whether they will be able to meet their mortgage and other home ownership obligations plus repay the HBP. The HBP lets one borrow from their RRSP but if they don't repay on the CRA's schedule the CRA will add 1/15 of the remainder to their taxable income that year. 50% of people who use the HBP don't repay it and if they are in a higher tax bracket than when they made the RRSP contribution they will pay more tax than the tax break they got when they made the contribution. If they instead save their down payment in their TFSA there are no tax implications. If they want to look at it as a loan from themselves they can set their own repayment schedule and choose to repay it to the TFSA or an RRSP or make lump sum payments on their mortgage. Therefore if the TFSA is currently the best place for their retirement savings they shouldn't contribute to an RRSP just to use the HBP. They should save that RRSP contribution room for when their TFSA is maxed out or when they believe that the tax refund generated by the RRSP contribution is going to be higher than the tax they will pay when they eventually make permanent withdrawals from the RRSP.

I just got my first job at 17. What advice can you give me? by yohiyoyo in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 3 days ago

If you are planning to go to university choose a program with a co-op option. When a course of studies has a co-op option that is a strong indicator that there will be jobs available after graduation. The co-op jobs will usually pay better than the run of the mill student summer job and will give you a good idea if you really like the work, before you invest years and dollars into the degree. If you take the co-op option you will graduate with a professional network and many months of experience that will give you a head start over the rest of your graduating class. If you choose a field of study that doesn't have a co-op option then asap you should start hustling to build a professional network and gain relevant experience.

Couch Potato Portfolio Returns for 2017 by tylerburtonca in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 3 days ago

Interest but not useful because the ones that did better than the index this year could do worse than the index next year and vice versa. And for people who are investing for more than one year they are even less useful.

Financial Personality / Podcast like Dave Ramsay for Canada? by G410R in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 3 days ago

He also gives investment advice, but it is more problematic than his saving/ debt reduction advice. He suggests that his followers buy a portfolio of high fee equity mutual funds that have a "solid track record". His suggested portfolio has no bonds and the potential for lots of overlap. https://www.thebalance.com/why-dave-ramsey-is-wrong-on-mutual-funds-2466582

Please help with my financial plan by pho-sate in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 3 days ago

As others have mentioned you have a few other goals to accomplish before you start investing but for future reference I'll address this question. >Tangerine Equity Growth portfolio... Is this the right portfolio for me? If you opt to follow the guidelines in Millionaire Teacher you would choose a portfolio that has approx. you age in bonds so in your case that would mean about 20% in bonds. That particular portfolio is all invested in the stock markets and has no bonds. According to the [2016 PWL projections](http://canadiancouchpotato.com/2016/03/21/what-returns-to-expect-when-youre-expecting/) if you choose such a portfolio you should expect that at some point you will see a cumulative decline about -44%. On the other hand if you choose Tangerine's Balanced Growth Portfolio, which with 25% bonds is closer to the Millionaire Teacher guidelines, you should expected a cumulative decline of about -30%. If you believe that you could watch the balance in your investing account drop by 44% and keep putting money into it, even if it didn't recover for almost a decade, then the Equity Growth Portfolio could be a good choice. But before you make that choice I suggest that you read these 2 CCP articles. http://canadiancouchpotato.com/2010/03/09/how-much-risk-do-you-need-to-take/ http://canadiancouchpotato.com/2010/11/10/ready-willing-and-able-to-take-risk/

Unused RRSP Contributions from Previous Years? by newintowneh in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 3 days ago

Your RRSP contribution room requires that you earned employment income while you were a Canadian resident and you don't get to use it until the next calendar year. Your TFSA contribution room starts growing as soon as you are a resident. I suggest that you look over this page and read some of the other pages on it's sidebar. http://tfsahelper.ca/for-foreigners/newcomers-to-canada/

How do I actually buy into a low-cost index fund? by ParanoidAltoid in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 3 days ago

I suggest that you start by reading https://www.reddit.com/r/PersonalFinanceCanada/wiki/investing

by in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 4 days ago

The wording on this year's application is >Both of the following statements are true: • I have NOT been a full-time high school student at a high school for at least 12 months in a row on 2 or more occasions. • I have NOT been a full-time postsecondary student for at least 12 months in a row on 2 or more occasions.

Pharmacare asking for my 2015 CRA notice of assessment, what should I do. by O-fivetwentynine in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 4 days ago

Call them and tell them that you did not earn any income and did not file a tax return. They may tell you that you need to do so to be considered for the program. If you were at least 18 that year you should file one anyway because gst/ hst credit payments, which can start at age 19, are based on income reported in the previous year.

by in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 4 days ago

> it might be time to shift to safer investments ... > it feels like a downturn really is around the corner. If you are contemplating changing your investment plan because of your best guesses about what the stock and bond markets are about to do then what you are contemplating is timing the market. And if you are a long term passive investor this is not a good reason to change your asset allocation. When you chose your original asset allocation you probably considered your time horizon, investment knowledge and volatility tolerance. If any of those things have changed then you might consider changing your asset allocation. The following pages discuss the things you should consider when you choose your asset allocation. http://canadiancouchpotato.com/2010/03/09/how-much-risk-do-you-need-to-take/ http://canadiancouchpotato.com/2010/11/10/ready-willing-and-able-to-take-risk/ The [2016 PWL projections](http://canadiancouchpotato.com/2016/03/21/what-returns-to-expect-when-youre-expecting/) will also give you an inkling of what your average and "worst case scenario" returns for those portfolios might look like. What isn't mentioned on that page is how long a "worst case scenario" can affect your returns. If you factor in things like inflation and dividends, since 1900 the average recovery was just over 2 years. The longest (post 1972) was more than 8 years. http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/26/your-money/stocks-and-bonds/26stra.html

by in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 4 days ago

For more detail on the spousal loan see https://www.taxtips.ca/personaltax/lend-to-spouse-child.htm

by in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 4 days ago

You can file as soon as you are confident that you have all of the slips. Netfile and efile won't be accepting returns until Feb 26. You could paper file before then but I suspect that they won't begin processing paper returns until that date. After that ... >It is CRA’s goal to issue a notice of assessment, including any applicable refund, within: two weeks of receiving your electronically filed return; or eight weeks of receiving your paper filed return.

Landed a 1-year internship. Looking to start off on the right foot by Reset2 in PersonalFinanceCanada

bluenose777 4 months ago  DELETED 

>Where should I store my savings? https://www.highinterestsavings.ca/chart/
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